THE CLYDESDALE AND YORKSHIRE BANKS IP100 ENTRANT – MUJO MECHANICS


Company name: Mujo Mechanics

Industry sector: Medical Technology

Business activity: MUJO’s ‘Intelligent MSK’ technology allows the delivery of targeted musculoskeletal (MSK) rehabilitation to cost- effectively identify, treat and ultimately prevent a range of muscular and joint issues.

PROBLEM

The NHS spends £10bn per annum on MSK care, of which up to £5bn is wasted through inefficient patient pathway decisions or ineffective or inappropriate treatments. In fact, MSK
is the leading cause of repeat GP visits in the UK, with many patients ending up in long-term pain or undergoing costly orthopaedic surgeries. Waiting times for effective treatment mean 31 million working days are lost to employers due to MSK-related absences.

MUJO SOLUTION

‘MUJO’s technology-based solution uses ‘smart’ exercise devices that deliver targeted rehab to the complex joints of the shoulder, hip and spine over full range in different planes of movement.

Real-time movement feedback is provided to patients via software picking up information from sensors embedded in the device. Data is stored in NHS compliant cloud records and combined with patient information for an objective assessment of joint health that can be shared across providers.

As the networked effect of the MUJO system and usage grows, a predictive model identifies appropriate patients for treatment at the triage stage and provides physiotherapists with decision support tools to aid the prescription of optimal exercises appropriate for each individual for best outcomes.

CURRENT PARTNERS

Having gained independent clinical validation from a government funded study conducted at The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital and being adopted by the English Institute of Sport, MUJO is beginning to work with integrated pathway managers such as CircleHealth’s Bedfordshire MSK service, corporate wellness managers and via MUJO’s own private patient clinic to improve the delivery of MSK care.

 

 

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